Home Entertainment Netflix tried new testing ways with Human curation feature

Netflix tried new testing ways with Human curation feature

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The online streaming platform, Netflix, has released a ‘Netflix Collections Feature.’ This feature is currently accessible to selected IOS users.

Generally, the streaming giant uses a set of complicated algorithms to show suggestions and recommendations to its users. Netflix is working on curation from real, honest-to-goodness humans.

Netflix, says experts curate the content on its creative teams and that collections are organized as per factors like genre, tone, storyline, character traits, tastes, and preferences.

If a user is involved in the test, a pop-up appears the next time they open Netflix. This takes the place of ‘My List,’ queue at the top of the app. Many users have not appreciated this change.

Netflix has said that it may or may not be a permanent feature, and also the feature is not accessible globally to all its users.

The feature tries to show accurate and specific rows of shows and movies that it thinks a certain user will like such as ‘Critically acclaimed Workplace TV shows”, “Let’s keep it light”, “Dark and Devious TV shows”, “Women who rule the Screen”, “Prizewinning Movie Picks” and many more.

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However, it has been reported that some of the titles are too similar. For instance, there is hardly any difference, between “Just for Laughs” and “Let’s keep it Light.”

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Jeff Higgins first spotted the human-led curation feature on Twitter. Typically, Netflix formed and algorithms and selected content based on a user’s viewing history.

In an official statement released by Netflix, it said, “We’re always looking for new ways to connect our fans with titles we think they’ll love, so we’re testing out a new way to curate Netflix titles into collections on the Netflix iOS app. Our test generally varies in how long they run for an in which countries they run in, and they may or may not be permanent features on our services.”

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